Exercise Won’t Help You Lose Weight. But It Will Help You Live Longer.

By VitaMist Ltd
on December 01, 2016

Exercise Won’t Help You Lose Weight.  But It Will Help You Live Longer.

How do you lose weight?  Diet and exercise.  That much has been ingrained in us since youth.  So you take up a fad diet, get a gym membership, toil away for weeks and are left wondering why the formula for weight loss does not work for you.  It turns out, you’re not so different from everybody else.  Over the past several years, studies have shown us that half of what we learned about weight loss is wrong. 

As it turns out, exercise is great for your overall health, immune system, and longevity, but it’s not so great at shedding those extra pounds.  In the end, it really isn’t all that helpful for losing weight.

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Evaluating Health Information on the Internet

By VitaMist Ltd
on November 01, 2016

Evaluating Health Information on the Internet

The growing popularity of the Internet has made finding health information easier and faster. Much of the information on the Internet is valuable; however, the Internet also allows rapid and widespread distribution of false and misleading information. You should carefully consider the source of information you find on the Internet and discuss that information with your health care provider. This fact sheet can help you decide whether the health information you find on the Internet or receive by e-mail is likely to be reliable.

Any Web site should make it easy for you to learn who is responsible for the site and its information.  If the person or organization in charge of the Web site did not write the material, the Web site should clearly identify the original source of the information.

Who runs the Web site?

Any Web site should make it easy for you to learn who is responsible for the site and its information. Websites that do not provide this information cannot be relied upon.  There is no way to know if they are associated with a business, if they have a political agenda or if they even know what they are talking about.

Who pays for the Web site?

It costs money to run a website. The source of a website's funding should be clearly stated or readily apparent. For example, the U.S. government funds websites with addresses ending in ".gov," educational institutes maintain ".edu" sites, noncommercial organizations' addresses often use ".org," while ".com" denotes a commercial organization (businesses). A Web site's source of funding can affect the content it presents, how it presents that content, and what the owner wants to accomplish on the site.

What is the Web site's purpose?

The person or organization that runs a website and the site's funding sources determine the site's purpose. Many Web sites have a link to information about the site, often called "About This Site." This page should clearly state the purpose of the site and help you evaluate the trustworthiness of the site's information. Although many legitimate websites sell health and medical products, keep in mind that the site owner's desire to promote a product or service can influence the accuracy of the health information they present. Looking for another source of health information that is independent and unbiased can help you validate the accuracy of the material presented on a Web site.  In other words, while we at VitaMist post health tips to aid you, please do not hesitate to double check our information with unbiased sources!  Think of it as getting a second opinion.

What is the original source of the website's information?

Many health and medical Web sites post information that the owner has collected from other Web sites or sources. If the person or organization in charge of the site did not write the material, they should clearly identify the original source.

How does the Web site document the evidence supporting its information?

Websites should identify the medical and scientific evidence that supports the material presented on the site. Medical facts and figures should have references (such as citations of articles published in medical journals). Also, opinions or advice should be clearly set apart from information that is "evidence based" (that is, based on research results). Testimonials from people who said they have tried a particular product or service are not evidence based and usually cannot be corroborated.

Who reviewed the information before the owner posted it on the Web site?

Health-related websites should give information about the medical credentials of the people who prepared or reviewed the material on the Web site. For example, the Office of Dietary Supplements Web site, where VitaMist gets much of its information,  contains fact sheets about vitamins minerals and other dietary supplements. These documents undergo extensive scientific review by recognized experts from the academic and research communities.

How current is the information on the Web site?

Experts should review and update the material on Web sites on a regular basis. Medical information needs to be current because medical research is constantly coming up with new information about medical conditions and how best to treat or prevent them. Web sites should clearly post the most recent update or review date. Even if the information has not changed in a long time, the site owner should indicate that someone has reviewed it recently to ensure that the information is still valid.

What information about users does the Web site collect, and why?

Web sites routinely track the path users take through their sites to determine what pages people are viewing. However, many health-related Web sites also ask users to "subscribe" to or "become a member" of the site. Sites sometimes do this to collect a user fee or select relevant information for the user. The subscription or membership might allow the Web site owner to collect personal information about the user.

Any Web site asking you for personal information should explain exactly what the site will and will not do with the information. Many commercial sites sell "aggregate" data—such as what percent of their users take dietary supplements—about their users to other companies. In some cases, sites collect and reuse information that is "personally identifiable," such as your ZIP code, gender, and birth date. Be certain to read and understand any privacy policy or similar language on the site and do not sign up for anything that you do not fully understand.

How does the Web site manage interactions with users?

Web sites should always offer a way for users to contact the Web site owner with problems, feedback, and questions. If the site hosts a chat room or some other form of online discussion, it should explain the terms of using the service. For example, the site should explain whether anyone moderates the discussions and, if so, who provides the moderation and what criteria the moderator uses to determine which comments to accept and which to reject. Always read online discussions before participating to make sure that you are comfortable with the discussion and with what participants say to one another.

How can you verify the accuracy of information you receive via e-mail?

Carefully evaluate any e-mail messages you receive that provide health-related information. Consider the message's origin and purpose. Some companies or organizations use e-mail to advertise products or attract people to their Web sites. A critical eye is warranted if an individual or company is promoting a particular medical product or service in an e-mail without providing supporting medical evidence.

With all of the misinformation ou there, it can be easy to get caught up in health trends and marketing ploys that serve no purpose beyond emptying your wallet, or a raising panic over “issues” that are not worth fretting over at all.  So verify that health blog’s sources, check where your friend got the information they posted on Facebook, and by all means, double check VitaMist’s health tips before you take action, and certainly before you repost the disinformation yourself.

Special Report on Massage Therapy Breakthrough Benefits

By Steve Moren
on September 01, 2016
We talk a lot about diet, exercise and especially nutrition here, which makes sense given that we are a nutrition company.  Diet, exercise, and proper nutrition are not all that you need for good health.  To be truly healthy requires taking care of your body, your mind, and your spirit.  Your diet, mood, cognitive ability, physical health, and immune health are in a complex balancing act.  Each one is connected to the others, having profound effects upon each other.  Healing one of these areas will benefit the others while neglecting any one of them can bring them all crashing down.  Which leads me to this month’s tip:  Massage therapy is not just a great way to heal your body, it’s also one of the most pleasant things you can do for your health!

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Rekindle Your Romance

By Steve Moren
on February 01, 2016
I don’t usually write articles on sparking romance; health tips are kind of my thing.  But it’s February, which means Valentine’s Day is fast approaching.  So to get you ready for February 14th (Yes, it’s that soon, guys.  Trust me, I just googled it.) here are some health tips that will lead a healthier, more fulfilling life, with the bonus of getting your libido back to where you want it.  You won’t find classic quick tips here, like “Plan a date night!”  Just like a relationship, these tips take some time and effort.

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Suppressing Your Appetite

By Steve Moren
on January 01, 2016
I received an email in mid-December asking about appetite suppressants.  My response was around ten times longer than it needed to be.  This is a habit of mine, as some of you well know.  After replying, I thought of two or three or ten more bits of information that I could have included.  Rather than harassing a potential customer with multiple barrages of information, sending them into an information overload induced stupor, I decided that this topic would make for a decent Health Tip article.  Especially considering how often “weight loss” is added to our lists of New Year’s Resolutions.  So here we are.  Everything you ever wanted to know about suppressing your appetite.

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A New You for the New Year

By Bill Deihl
on January 01, 2016

Dear VitaMist Family,

2016 is already upon us, and with a new year comes new resolutions. I say “new” resolutions, but we tend to make the same ones over and over. “This year I will lose weight.” “This year I will l eat healthier.” “This year I will l quit my bad habits.” “This year I will grow my business.” “This year I will meet new and exciting people.” “This year I will….”

When I hear these resolutions, I feel like there must be some way I can help you achieve them. Not just some of them, like being healthier with VitaMist, or losing weight with our diet support program. The VitaMist family wants you to reach all of your goals. Every single one of them. A new you for the new year.

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You Are What You Absorb

By Steve Moren
on November 01, 2015

Contrary to popular belief, you are not what you eat.  You are what you absorb.  Not everything that hits your stomach gets used in your body, and not everything that that gets used in your body ever even hits your stomach.  In fact, you consume somewhere in the neighborhood of 550 liters of oxygen every single day.  If you tried drinking 550 liters of water in a day, you’d never leave the bathroom!  At least not until the paramedics wheeled you out.

Right now you might be thinking that unabsorbed sounds great, and if only your body would absorb less of it, you wouldn’t have those extra pounds around the waistline.  Unfortunately, caloric foods such as proteins, fats, and especially carbs are much easier to absorb than many calorie-free nutrients.  Deficiency in these can lead to grogginess, fatigue, depression, anxiety and poor health. This can happen even with the healthiest of diets.

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The Freshest in the World

By Steve Moren
on October 01, 2015

Scotch, cheese, cast iron cookware and your favorite pair of jeans; there’s no denying that some things just get better with age.  Unfortunately, your vitamins are not among them.  Even under ideal conditions, most supplements degrade over time.  Heat, light, humidity and the oxygen in the air all accelerate this process.

When we go grocery shopping, we select the freshest ingredients available.  We recognize that the freshness of our perishables is a reflection of their quality.  We test our fruits and vegetables for ripeness.  We ask the butchers and fishmongers, “Is it fresh?”  So why don’t we check the freshness of our vitamins?  Is checking the expiration date enough?  If you think about it, nutritional supplements are food, in a different form.  If you’re supplementing with pills, instead of VitaMist, then they probably don’t taste as good as food, but their ultimate purpose is the same.  Supplements provide a concentrated form of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), botanicals and even some macronutrients (carbs, fats, proteins, sodium, and potassium).  They are no different than food, so we should take the same approach with them that we do when we shop for groceries.  Recognize that their freshness is a reflection of their quality, avoid purchasing ‘overripe‘ supplements and always ask, “Is this fresh?”

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The 6 Categories of Superfoods

By Steve Moren
on September 28, 2015
You don’t often hear the words “superfood” and “delicious” used in the same sentence.  But when you look at the six major categories of superfoods, a healthier and tastier diet starts to come into view.  The best diets are those that incorporate a lot of variety.  Eating your kale salad twice a day can be more than a little tedious, and it’s tough to stick with a diet like that.  Look into all six categories of superfoods, and you’ll find a diet that’s easy to stick to.  Pick and choose your superfood.  Mix it up from meal meal, day to day.  Satisfy your hunger with your favorite snacks from these categories.  Supplement your diet with the nutrients you’re missing.  Do these things, and you’ll have the energy you want, without being restricted to the depressing and often unhealthy fad diets that have flooded the market.

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14 Vegetables With a Higher Nutrient Density Than Kale

By Steve Moren
on September 17, 2015

These days it seems the whole world has gone kale krazy.  But is kale really the most super of all superfoods? The Centers for Disease Control doesn't think so. In fact, they don't even rank it in the top ten supervegetables.  Kale lands in fifteenth place, with a respectable 49.07 Nutrient Density Score.  Here's the CDC's top 15:

Rank Vegetable Nutrient Density Score
15 Kale 49.07

So, this means you can stop eating kale, right?

Closeup of Kale Leaves

Sorry kale haters, but 49.07 is still a highly respectable Nutrient Density Score.  Your biggest takeaway here is that kale is not your one stop shop for daily nutrients.  In fact, the healthiest (and most enjoyable) diets are those with a lot of variety.  So mix your kale with some other tasty greens, to ensure a healthy and happy diet!

 A Cautionary Kale:  Although it's in 15th place, kale is still action packed with nutrients, including a whopping 1180 times the recommended daily intake of Vitamin K.  People on blood thinners should consult their health care providers about what not to eat because greens like kale and spinach might be doing more harm than good!

14 Chives 54.80
Chives Grwoning in the WildEasily the healthiest topping you put on your baked potato (and arguably the only healthy topping you put on your baked potato). Allium vegetables, such as garlic, scallions, onions and leeks, have long been pushed for their beneficial properties, but chives just might be the healthiest of the bunch! Their potent flavor makes it difficult to consume a full serving of them, but sprinkling a little on your meals can add a flavor kick that's packed with vitamins and minerals.
13 Endives 60.44

Three Endives Lined Up in a RowAs far as green, leafy vegetables go, endives don't seem very green or leafy. That doesn't stop them from being packed full of nutrients, despite containing hardly any calories.  The endive the CDC is referring to here is the Belgian endive pictured on the right.

Endives are a great source of folate, vitamin K, choline, minerals, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, as well as additional vitamins though they're found in much smaller amounts.

12 Mustard Greens 61.39

Bunch of Mustard Greens Against a Plain White BackdropMustard Greens have been shown to lower cholesterol, and they fall just short of collard greens and kale in this ability.  Like many green, leafy vegetables, mustard greens contain cancer-fighting agents, and they are second only to Brussels sprouts in glucosinolate, one such compound.

A terrific source of vitamins and minerals, and packing a strong peppery bite, mustard greens are great as a side dish or mixed in with other greens in a salad.

11 Turnip Greens 62.12

Basket of Turnips With Their Greens Still AttachedTurnip Greens can be rather bitter, but a major reason for this is the considerable amount of calcium they provide.  In fact, one cup of steamed turnip greens can provide 20% of your daily calcium requirements.  This is especially impressive when you take into consideration that calcium has far and away the highest daily requirement of all the micronutrients.

Calcium is not their only benefit, though.  Turnip greens still come packed with other minerals, vitamins, protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

10 Collard Greens 62.49
Closeup of a Collard green leafSadly, cooking collard greens in bacon fat does not make them more healthy, only more fattening and delicious.  When cooking greens, the optimal method is always to steam them.  Boiling and other methods leach nutrients from them.  Heat tends to destabilize and destroy many vitamins, but the effect is not as pronounced when steaming vegetables.  In fact, steaming vegetables can increase the variety of helpful sulfur containing compounds.
9 Romaine Lettuce 63.48
Row of Lettuce Ready for Harvest

Everybody knows that romaine lettuce is far healthier than the relatively useless iceberg lettuce.  Or at least they do after reading that last sentence.  Romaine lettuce is a staple in most salads, so it's nice to see that this mild and fresh tasting lettuce is so nutrient rich.

Use romaine lettuce as a base for your salads, and then add other greens and herbs around it for a variety of exciting flavors.  Cilantro did not make this list, but it's still a very nutritious herb that pairs well with a little romaine.  Add in some leaf lettuce and one of the more "peppery" vegetables, such as mustard greens and you're off to a tasty and healthy start.  You don't need to rely on your vinaigrette to enhance the flavor of your salad!  Variety is the spice of life, after all.

8 Parsley 65.59

Plethora of ParsleyOne of the tastiest plants to make this list, parsley is the most popular herb in the world.  It's great as a seasoning or added to salads, but parsley can also be used in uncommon ways, such as adding it to a sandwich in place of lettuce.

Not just flavorful, parsley is noted for being rich in vitamin C, antioxidants and carcinogen neutralizing agents.  It has been also been associated with good heart health.

7 Leaf Lettuce 70.73

Leaf Lettuce CloseupLeaf lettuce is second only to Popeye's favorite in nutrient density among the most common green, leafy vegetables.  While spinach dominates in nearly every category, an NDS of 70.73 is nothing to sneeze at.  That's more than twice the NDS of broccoli.

Maybe parents should be telling their children to eat their lettuce, instead?

6 Chicory 73.36
Chicory on Burlap

The chicory family includes radicchio, escarole and cultivated dandelion (which has a more subtle flavor than the wild dandelion weeds).  The taste of each is similar, despite their differences in appearance, and each one is packed full of nutrients.

Beyond the usual vitamins and minerals, chicory is an excellent source of potassium, a valuable electrolyte.

5 Spinach 86.43

Spinach LeavesIt's no surprise to find spinach in the top five vegetable powerhouses.  A great source of calcium and vitamin K, spinach outstrips most green, leafy vegetables in nearly every nutrient category.

Long known for its versatility on the breakfast, lunch or dinner table, spinach is just as versatile as a nutrient delivery system.  Its well-rounded repertoire makes it a valuable addition to any meal.

4 Beet Greens 87.08
Beets with Greens at a Farmers Market

With the obvious exception of Soylent, most foods that end with the word "green" tend to be quite healthy, but none more so than beet greens.  The vibrant green colors of the leaves and deep reddish-purple of the stems and veins are our visual clues that these wonderful vegetables are packed with a variety of nutrients.

With a high concentration of iron, and more protein than most greens, beet greens contain sizable percentages of many of our daily requirements.  While their folate levels aren't overly impressive at 5% of the RDI, including one cup of beetroot with a serving of the greens can boost those levels to nearly 40% of the RDI.  Adding beetroots will also provide additional fiber, minerals, vitamin C and vitamin B6.

3 Chard 89.27
Swiss chard in a Variety of Colors

One of the prettier vegetables on the market, chard contains all of the carcinogen binding chemicals, bioflavonoids and phytonutrients we've come to expect out of our green, leafy vegetables, but with the addition of syringic acid.  Syringic acid is a nutrient that's been found to help regulate blood sugar levels.

Combine these amazing abilities with a nutrient density score of a whopping 89.27, and you've got yourself a vegetable that's not just pretty to look at, it's pretty darn good for you to eat it as well.

2 Chinese Cabbage 91.99
Chinese Cabbage

Like regular cabbage, only taller.  Oh, and also packed with an incredible amount of nutrients.  Chinese cabbage, or bok choy, contains very good amounts of 21 different nutrients.  This includes omega-3 fatty acids and even high concentrations of zinc.

Chinese cabbage is a great addition to any diet, but it's especially useful if you're looking for dietary sources of anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories.

1 Watercress 100.00
Watercress

And the Winner Is!

Watercress tops off the list at #1 with the unmatched nutrient density score of 100.  You don't hear a lot of talk about watercress outside of the nutritionally well informed, but it's long been known as a superfood.  Despite being very low in calories, it contains a wide variety of nutrients, without going overboard on the vitamin K as many green, leafy vegetables do.  In fact, watercress doesn't go all out in any single ingredient.  Where it shines is in its  jack-of-all-trades nature.

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