Close Friends Are Good For Your Health

By VitaMist Ltd
on October 25, 2017

Close Friends Are Good For Your Health

It’s pretty well-established at this point that having friends is good for you — over the years, study after study has found that social support is a significant predictor of a long, healthy life.

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A Phoenix In Phoenix

By VitaMist Ltd
on April 07, 2017

A Phoenix In Phoenix

One man’s dream that turned into a family’s dedication is now, today, becoming a cause for so many around the world.

VitaMist was invented by the late Joseph A. Deihl, a man with a dream. He stuck with his dream, and watched it become a reality with the opening of Mayor Pharmaceutical Laboratories, the only spray vitamin manufacturer in the world.

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Gummy Candy Could Be Healthier Than Gummy Vitamins

By Steve Moren
on March 20, 2017

Gummy Candy Could Be Healthier Than Gummy Vitamins

Which is Troubling, As Gummy Bears Aren't Healthy At All

Nutrition can be an endlessly confusing science, full of contradictory information — Does expensive really mean healthier? Is a vegan diet actually good for you? What does moderation even mean, anyway? — but every so often, you run into a decision that seems like a no-brainer. Like, for example, whether it’s better to satisfy your sweets craving with a handful of gummy vitamins or a handful of actual gummy candy. Both are made pretty much entirely of substances you can’t pronounce, but one is actually good for you. Obviously, you go with the vitamins.

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Is Subway's Chicken Actually Chicken?

By VitaMist Ltd
on March 16, 2017

Is Subway's Chicken Actually Chicken?

This article originally appeared on the Time Magazine website, Time.com.

Is Subway Chicken Really 50% Filler?

 

Subway is under fire after a Canadian television show reported that the restaurant’s chicken products could be made up of less than 50% actual chicken. According to tests performed at Trent University in Canada, the company’s chicken strips and oven-roasted chicken contained just 43% and 54% chicken DNA, respectively, consisting otherwise of soy and other filler ingredients.

The sandwich chain denies the allegations.

The investigation, which aired in February on the CBC program Marketplace, included DNA tests of chicken products purchased from several fast-food chains in Canada. Researcher Matt Harnden said on the show that his lab, which tests meat samples for both industry and government, could provide a “rough estimate” for the ratio of chicken DNA to other ingredients. (The episode can be viewed here on YouTube.)

Most chicken samples tested—from McDonald’s, Wendy, Tim Hortons and A&W—contained between 85% and 90% chicken DNA. Fast-food chicken wouldn’t be expected to be 100% bird, Harnden said, because of seasoning marinades, and other ingredients that are likely added in the preparation process.

But the chicken content of the samples from Subway was consistently low even after repeated testing, and the tests showed that much of the remaining DNA was from soy protein. “Assuming the data is right, that is a surprisingly large amount of soy,” says John Coupland, president of the Institute of Food Technologists and a professor of food science at Penn State University, who was not involved in the testing.

Elevated soy levels might be expected in reconstituted meat products, in which meat is ground up and stuck back together with binder ingredients, says Coupland. “But even then, 50% is high,” he says. “And it’s astonishingly high for something that you're supposed to think is a real, whole piece of chicken.”

In a statement sent to TIME on March 5, a representative for the company said, "Test results from laboratories in Canada and the U.S. clearly show that the Canadian chicken products tested had only trace amounts of soy, contradicting the accusations made during the broadcast of CBC Marketplace.'"

In an earlier statement provided to TIME, a Subway representative said, "Our chicken is 100% white meat with seasonings, marinated and delivered to our stores as a finished, cooked product. We have advised [Marketplace] of our strong objections... [and] we are insisting on a full retraction."

Subway’s U.S. site contains a list of ingredients used in its chicken products. For instance, the chicken breast strips contain "boneless skinless chicken breast with rib meat, water, 2% or less soy protein concentrate, modified potato starch, sodium phosphate, potassium chloride, salt, maltodextrin, yeast extract, flavors, natural flavors, dextrose, caramelized sugar, paprika, vinegar solids, paprika extract and chicken broth," according to Subway's website.

Coupland says that a high soy content that turned up in the Marketwatch study may be concerning to some with allergies. Most people with an allergy know to avoid fast food, since traces of soy are found in so many processed foods, he says. “But if people think they’re getting pure chicken and they’re in fact getting a mouthful of soy, that’s potentially dangerous."

Nutrition tests performed for Marketplace also found that fast-food chicken contained 25% less protein than home-cooked samples, and between 7 to 10 times the amount of sodium.

Subway’s chicken strips and oven-roasted chicken are both available at United States locations, but, according to the company's website, their ingredients vary slightly from their Canadian counterparts. Both countries include soy protein in their chicken strips, but only the U.S. version specifies that it’s present in quantities of 2% or less. And while Canada does include soy as an ingredient in its chicken patty used for the oven-roasted chicken sub, the United States does not.

A panel of taste testers on Marketplace rated Subway’s chicken as their least favorite among the fast food options, noting that the samples tasted "saltier" and "more artificial" than those from other chains. One panelist commented that Subway’s chicken strips tasted like “more flavor than actual chicken.”

The fast-food chain, which prides itself on offering healthy alternatives to burgers and fries, was hit with a rash of bad publicity in 2014 when customers complained that azodicarbonamide, a food-grade material also found in yoga mats, was used in their bread. Subway removed the chemical, and pledged the next year to remove all artificial ingredients from its food in North America by 2017.

Exercise Won’t Help You Lose Weight. But It Will Help You Live Longer.

By VitaMist Ltd
on December 01, 2016

Exercise Won’t Help You Lose Weight.  But It Will Help You Live Longer.

How do you lose weight?  Diet and exercise.  That much has been ingrained in us since youth.  So you take up a fad diet, get a gym membership, toil away for weeks and are left wondering why the formula for weight loss does not work for you.  It turns out, you’re not so different from everybody else.  Over the past several years, studies have shown us that half of what we learned about weight loss is wrong. 

As it turns out, exercise is great for your overall health, immune system, and longevity, but it’s not so great at shedding those extra pounds.  In the end, it really isn’t all that helpful for losing weight.

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Evaluating Health Information on the Internet

By VitaMist Ltd
on November 01, 2016

Evaluating Health Information on the Internet

The growing popularity of the Internet has made finding health information easier and faster. Much of the information on the Internet is valuable; however, the Internet also allows rapid and widespread distribution of false and misleading information. You should carefully consider the source of information you find on the Internet and discuss that information with your health care provider. This fact sheet can help you decide whether the health information you find on the Internet or receive by e-mail is likely to be reliable.

Any Web site should make it easy for you to learn who is responsible for the site and its information.  If the person or organization in charge of the Web site did not write the material, the Web site should clearly identify the original source of the information.

Who runs the Web site?

Any Web site should make it easy for you to learn who is responsible for the site and its information. Websites that do not provide this information cannot be relied upon.  There is no way to know if they are associated with a business, if they have a political agenda or if they even know what they are talking about.

Who pays for the Web site?

It costs money to run a website. The source of a website's funding should be clearly stated or readily apparent. For example, the U.S. government funds websites with addresses ending in ".gov," educational institutes maintain ".edu" sites, noncommercial organizations' addresses often use ".org," while ".com" denotes a commercial organization (businesses). A Web site's source of funding can affect the content it presents, how it presents that content, and what the owner wants to accomplish on the site.

What is the Web site's purpose?

The person or organization that runs a website and the site's funding sources determine the site's purpose. Many Web sites have a link to information about the site, often called "About This Site." This page should clearly state the purpose of the site and help you evaluate the trustworthiness of the site's information. Although many legitimate websites sell health and medical products, keep in mind that the site owner's desire to promote a product or service can influence the accuracy of the health information they present. Looking for another source of health information that is independent and unbiased can help you validate the accuracy of the material presented on a Web site.  In other words, while we at VitaMist post health tips to aid you, please do not hesitate to double check our information with unbiased sources!  Think of it as getting a second opinion.

What is the original source of the website's information?

Many health and medical Web sites post information that the owner has collected from other Web sites or sources. If the person or organization in charge of the site did not write the material, they should clearly identify the original source.

How does the Web site document the evidence supporting its information?

Websites should identify the medical and scientific evidence that supports the material presented on the site. Medical facts and figures should have references (such as citations of articles published in medical journals). Also, opinions or advice should be clearly set apart from information that is "evidence based" (that is, based on research results). Testimonials from people who said they have tried a particular product or service are not evidence based and usually cannot be corroborated.

Who reviewed the information before the owner posted it on the Web site?

Health-related websites should give information about the medical credentials of the people who prepared or reviewed the material on the Web site. For example, the Office of Dietary Supplements Web site, where VitaMist gets much of its information,  contains fact sheets about vitamins minerals and other dietary supplements. These documents undergo extensive scientific review by recognized experts from the academic and research communities.

How current is the information on the Web site?

Experts should review and update the material on Web sites on a regular basis. Medical information needs to be current because medical research is constantly coming up with new information about medical conditions and how best to treat or prevent them. Web sites should clearly post the most recent update or review date. Even if the information has not changed in a long time, the site owner should indicate that someone has reviewed it recently to ensure that the information is still valid.

What information about users does the Web site collect, and why?

Web sites routinely track the path users take through their sites to determine what pages people are viewing. However, many health-related Web sites also ask users to "subscribe" to or "become a member" of the site. Sites sometimes do this to collect a user fee or select relevant information for the user. The subscription or membership might allow the Web site owner to collect personal information about the user.

Any Web site asking you for personal information should explain exactly what the site will and will not do with the information. Many commercial sites sell "aggregate" data—such as what percent of their users take dietary supplements—about their users to other companies. In some cases, sites collect and reuse information that is "personally identifiable," such as your ZIP code, gender, and birth date. Be certain to read and understand any privacy policy or similar language on the site and do not sign up for anything that you do not fully understand.

How does the Web site manage interactions with users?

Web sites should always offer a way for users to contact the Web site owner with problems, feedback, and questions. If the site hosts a chat room or some other form of online discussion, it should explain the terms of using the service. For example, the site should explain whether anyone moderates the discussions and, if so, who provides the moderation and what criteria the moderator uses to determine which comments to accept and which to reject. Always read online discussions before participating to make sure that you are comfortable with the discussion and with what participants say to one another.

How can you verify the accuracy of information you receive via e-mail?

Carefully evaluate any e-mail messages you receive that provide health-related information. Consider the message's origin and purpose. Some companies or organizations use e-mail to advertise products or attract people to their Web sites. A critical eye is warranted if an individual or company is promoting a particular medical product or service in an e-mail without providing supporting medical evidence.

With all of the misinformation ou there, it can be easy to get caught up in health trends and marketing ploys that serve no purpose beyond emptying your wallet, or a raising panic over “issues” that are not worth fretting over at all.  So verify that health blog’s sources, check where your friend got the information they posted on Facebook, and by all means, double check VitaMist’s health tips before you take action, and certainly before you repost the disinformation yourself.

Special Report on Massage Therapy Breakthrough Benefits

By Steve Moren
on September 01, 2016
We talk a lot about diet, exercise and especially nutrition here, which makes sense given that we are a nutrition company.  Diet, exercise, and proper nutrition are not all that you need for good health.  To be truly healthy requires taking care of your body, your mind, and your spirit.  Your diet, mood, cognitive ability, physical health, and immune health are in a complex balancing act.  Each one is connected to the others, having profound effects upon each other.  Healing one of these areas will benefit the others while neglecting any one of them can bring them all crashing down.  Which leads me to this month’s tip:  Massage therapy is not just a great way to heal your body, it’s also one of the most pleasant things you can do for your health!

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Suppressing Your Appetite

By Steve Moren
on January 01, 2016
I received an email in mid-December asking about appetite suppressants.  My response was around ten times longer than it needed to be.  This is a habit of mine, as some of you well know.  After replying, I thought of two or three or ten more bits of information that I could have included.  Rather than harassing a potential customer with multiple barrages of information, sending them into an information overload induced stupor, I decided that this topic would make for a decent Health Tip article.  Especially considering how often “weight loss” is added to our lists of New Year’s Resolutions.  So here we are.  Everything you ever wanted to know about suppressing your appetite.

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You Are What You Absorb

By Steve Moren
on November 01, 2015

Contrary to popular belief, you are not what you eat.  You are what you absorb.  Not everything that hits your stomach gets used in your body, and not everything that that gets used in your body ever even hits your stomach.  In fact, you consume somewhere in the neighborhood of 550 liters of oxygen every single day.  If you tried drinking 550 liters of water in a day, you’d never leave the bathroom!  At least not until the paramedics wheeled you out.

Right now you might be thinking that unabsorbed sounds great, and if only your body would absorb less of it, you wouldn’t have those extra pounds around the waistline.  Unfortunately, caloric foods such as proteins, fats, and especially carbs are much easier to absorb than many calorie-free nutrients.  Deficiency in these can lead to grogginess, fatigue, depression, anxiety and poor health. This can happen even with the healthiest of diets.

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The Freshest in the World

By Steve Moren
on October 01, 2015

Scotch, cheese, cast iron cookware and your favorite pair of jeans; there’s no denying that some things just get better with age.  Unfortunately, your vitamins are not among them.  Even under ideal conditions, most supplements degrade over time.  Heat, light, humidity and the oxygen in the air all accelerate this process.

When we go grocery shopping, we select the freshest ingredients available.  We recognize that the freshness of our perishables is a reflection of their quality.  We test our fruits and vegetables for ripeness.  We ask the butchers and fishmongers, “Is it fresh?”  So why don’t we check the freshness of our vitamins?  Is checking the expiration date enough?  If you think about it, nutritional supplements are food, in a different form.  If you’re supplementing with pills, instead of VitaMist, then they probably don’t taste as good as food, but their ultimate purpose is the same.  Supplements provide a concentrated form of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), botanicals and even some macronutrients (carbs, fats, proteins, sodium, and potassium).  They are no different than food, so we should take the same approach with them that we do when we shop for groceries.  Recognize that their freshness is a reflection of their quality, avoid purchasing ‘overripe‘ supplements and always ask, “Is this fresh?”

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From the Blog

Sari's Letter, November 2017

Sari's Letter, November 2017

November 01, 2017

As we head into this Holiday Season I thought I would share this wonderful story with you;

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