How Long Do You Have to Work Out to See Results?

By VitaMist Ltd
on May 04, 2017

How Long Do You Have to Work Out to See Results?

The truth is, the weight didn’t come on overnight, so it is going to take you longer to see the results you want to see than you think it will. The good news is that by eating healthy and exercising, you can maximize fat loss and produce the results you want to get your best body ever.

 

Measuring & Tracking your Results

The scale is not the only way to measure your training results. In fact, the scale is likely one of the worst ways to measure your results. If you are weighing yourself everyday to see if you lost a pound, you are only fooling yourself. Water retention can cause your body weight to fluctuate by 2-3 pounds daily!

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Exercise Won’t Help You Lose Weight. But It Will Help You Live Longer.

By VitaMist Ltd
on December 01, 2016

Exercise Won’t Help You Lose Weight.  But It Will Help You Live Longer.

How do you lose weight?  Diet and exercise.  That much has been ingrained in us since youth.  So you take up a fad diet, get a gym membership, toil away for weeks and are left wondering why the formula for weight loss does not work for you.  It turns out, you’re not so different from everybody else.  Over the past several years, studies have shown us that half of what we learned about weight loss is wrong. 

As it turns out, exercise is great for your overall health, immune system, and longevity, but it’s not so great at shedding those extra pounds.  In the end, it really isn’t all that helpful for losing weight.

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You Have Terrible Posture

By Steve Moren
on May 01, 2016

No, that’s not meant to be a mediocre insults.  The vast majority of us have terrible posture, and it is hurting us in more ways than we think.  The trouble isn't just that slumped shoulders make you look shorter, heavier and unconfident. Over time, your poor posture takes a tremendous toll on your spine, shoulders, hips, and knees. In fact, it can cause a domino effect of health problems, such as joint pain, reduced flexibility, and weakened or shortened muscles, all which limit the ability to burn fat and build strength.

But worry not, because all of these problems can be adjusted.  Bad posture is learned, not natural.  Over time, our bodies adjust to the poor posture by shortening, or tightening one muscle group, while the opposing muscle group grows weaker.  We can correct these issues by stretching out the tightened muscles, and exercising the weakened ones.  Are you ready to straighten yourself out?

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Suppressing Your Appetite

By Steve Moren
on January 01, 2016
I received an email in mid-December asking about appetite suppressants.  My response was around ten times longer than it needed to be.  This is a habit of mine, as some of you well know.  After replying, I thought of two or three or ten more bits of information that I could have included.  Rather than harassing a potential customer with multiple barrages of information, sending them into an information overload induced stupor, I decided that this topic would make for a decent Health Tip article.  Especially considering how often “weight loss” is added to our lists of New Year’s Resolutions.  So here we are.  Everything you ever wanted to know about suppressing your appetite.

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A New You for the New Year

By Bill Deihl
on January 01, 2016

Dear VitaMist Family,

2016 is already upon us, and with a new year comes new resolutions. I say “new” resolutions, but we tend to make the same ones over and over. “This year I will lose weight.” “This year I will l eat healthier.” “This year I will l quit my bad habits.” “This year I will grow my business.” “This year I will meet new and exciting people.” “This year I will….”

When I hear these resolutions, I feel like there must be some way I can help you achieve them. Not just some of them, like being healthier with VitaMist, or losing weight with our diet support program. The VitaMist family wants you to reach all of your goals. Every single one of them. A new you for the new year.

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The Nutritional Trends for 2016

By Bill Deihl
on December 28, 2015

The Nutritional Trends for 2016

With 2016 here, consumers are looking for that magic pill that will make them look and feel better.  They will find out that the magic pill is no longer a pill, and the nutrition trends of 2016 will put them on the right path. Nutrition can be confusing if you listen to all the hype.

How can the health of both our family and ourselves be improved?  Here are the first 7 of the top 14 predictions that will put you on track in 2016:

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Here Comes Halloween!

By Bill Deihl
on October 01, 2015

October always seem to get me excited because it has one of my favorite holidays, Halloween.  For at least 15 years my husband and I held Halloween parties at our home.  For those of you who were members of our VitaMist family in those days, I’m sure you remember being there.

October and Halloween also means CANDY, CANDY, CANDY and more CANDY! Have you noticed that every year it’s the same?  We buy the candy in bulk well before the trick-or-treaters show up, and then we start eating it OURSELVES!  Our workplaces are full of those delicious treats. In fact, everywhere we go there seems to be bowl after bowl of CANDY!  We always seem to say to ourselves “I’ll just take one!”  But somehow that one piece turns into many.

Eventually all those “just ones” add up… around our middles.

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14 Vegetables With a Higher Nutrient Density Than Kale

By Steve Moren
on September 17, 2015

These days it seems the whole world has gone kale krazy.  But is kale really the most super of all superfoods? The Centers for Disease Control doesn't think so. In fact, they don't even rank it in the top ten supervegetables.  Kale lands in fifteenth place, with a respectable 49.07 Nutrient Density Score.  Here's the CDC's top 15:

Rank Vegetable Nutrient Density Score
15 Kale 49.07

So, this means you can stop eating kale, right?

Closeup of Kale Leaves

Sorry kale haters, but 49.07 is still a highly respectable Nutrient Density Score.  Your biggest takeaway here is that kale is not your one stop shop for daily nutrients.  In fact, the healthiest (and most enjoyable) diets are those with a lot of variety.  So mix your kale with some other tasty greens, to ensure a healthy and happy diet!

 A Cautionary Kale:  Although it's in 15th place, kale is still action packed with nutrients, including a whopping 1180 times the recommended daily intake of Vitamin K.  People on blood thinners should consult their health care providers about what not to eat because greens like kale and spinach might be doing more harm than good!

14 Chives 54.80
Chives Grwoning in the WildEasily the healthiest topping you put on your baked potato (and arguably the only healthy topping you put on your baked potato). Allium vegetables, such as garlic, scallions, onions and leeks, have long been pushed for their beneficial properties, but chives just might be the healthiest of the bunch! Their potent flavor makes it difficult to consume a full serving of them, but sprinkling a little on your meals can add a flavor kick that's packed with vitamins and minerals.
13 Endives 60.44

Three Endives Lined Up in a RowAs far as green, leafy vegetables go, endives don't seem very green or leafy. That doesn't stop them from being packed full of nutrients, despite containing hardly any calories.  The endive the CDC is referring to here is the Belgian endive pictured on the right.

Endives are a great source of folate, vitamin K, choline, minerals, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, as well as additional vitamins though they're found in much smaller amounts.

12 Mustard Greens 61.39

Bunch of Mustard Greens Against a Plain White BackdropMustard Greens have been shown to lower cholesterol, and they fall just short of collard greens and kale in this ability.  Like many green, leafy vegetables, mustard greens contain cancer-fighting agents, and they are second only to Brussels sprouts in glucosinolate, one such compound.

A terrific source of vitamins and minerals, and packing a strong peppery bite, mustard greens are great as a side dish or mixed in with other greens in a salad.

11 Turnip Greens 62.12

Basket of Turnips With Their Greens Still AttachedTurnip Greens can be rather bitter, but a major reason for this is the considerable amount of calcium they provide.  In fact, one cup of steamed turnip greens can provide 20% of your daily calcium requirements.  This is especially impressive when you take into consideration that calcium has far and away the highest daily requirement of all the micronutrients.

Calcium is not their only benefit, though.  Turnip greens still come packed with other minerals, vitamins, protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

10 Collard Greens 62.49
Closeup of a Collard green leafSadly, cooking collard greens in bacon fat does not make them more healthy, only more fattening and delicious.  When cooking greens, the optimal method is always to steam them.  Boiling and other methods leach nutrients from them.  Heat tends to destabilize and destroy many vitamins, but the effect is not as pronounced when steaming vegetables.  In fact, steaming vegetables can increase the variety of helpful sulfur containing compounds.
9 Romaine Lettuce 63.48
Row of Lettuce Ready for Harvest

Everybody knows that romaine lettuce is far healthier than the relatively useless iceberg lettuce.  Or at least they do after reading that last sentence.  Romaine lettuce is a staple in most salads, so it's nice to see that this mild and fresh tasting lettuce is so nutrient rich.

Use romaine lettuce as a base for your salads, and then add other greens and herbs around it for a variety of exciting flavors.  Cilantro did not make this list, but it's still a very nutritious herb that pairs well with a little romaine.  Add in some leaf lettuce and one of the more "peppery" vegetables, such as mustard greens and you're off to a tasty and healthy start.  You don't need to rely on your vinaigrette to enhance the flavor of your salad!  Variety is the spice of life, after all.

8 Parsley 65.59

Plethora of ParsleyOne of the tastiest plants to make this list, parsley is the most popular herb in the world.  It's great as a seasoning or added to salads, but parsley can also be used in uncommon ways, such as adding it to a sandwich in place of lettuce.

Not just flavorful, parsley is noted for being rich in vitamin C, antioxidants and carcinogen neutralizing agents.  It has been also been associated with good heart health.

7 Leaf Lettuce 70.73

Leaf Lettuce CloseupLeaf lettuce is second only to Popeye's favorite in nutrient density among the most common green, leafy vegetables.  While spinach dominates in nearly every category, an NDS of 70.73 is nothing to sneeze at.  That's more than twice the NDS of broccoli.

Maybe parents should be telling their children to eat their lettuce, instead?

6 Chicory 73.36
Chicory on Burlap

The chicory family includes radicchio, escarole and cultivated dandelion (which has a more subtle flavor than the wild dandelion weeds).  The taste of each is similar, despite their differences in appearance, and each one is packed full of nutrients.

Beyond the usual vitamins and minerals, chicory is an excellent source of potassium, a valuable electrolyte.

5 Spinach 86.43

Spinach LeavesIt's no surprise to find spinach in the top five vegetable powerhouses.  A great source of calcium and vitamin K, spinach outstrips most green, leafy vegetables in nearly every nutrient category.

Long known for its versatility on the breakfast, lunch or dinner table, spinach is just as versatile as a nutrient delivery system.  Its well-rounded repertoire makes it a valuable addition to any meal.

4 Beet Greens 87.08
Beets with Greens at a Farmers Market

With the obvious exception of Soylent, most foods that end with the word "green" tend to be quite healthy, but none more so than beet greens.  The vibrant green colors of the leaves and deep reddish-purple of the stems and veins are our visual clues that these wonderful vegetables are packed with a variety of nutrients.

With a high concentration of iron, and more protein than most greens, beet greens contain sizable percentages of many of our daily requirements.  While their folate levels aren't overly impressive at 5% of the RDI, including one cup of beetroot with a serving of the greens can boost those levels to nearly 40% of the RDI.  Adding beetroots will also provide additional fiber, minerals, vitamin C and vitamin B6.

3 Chard 89.27
Swiss chard in a Variety of Colors

One of the prettier vegetables on the market, chard contains all of the carcinogen binding chemicals, bioflavonoids and phytonutrients we've come to expect out of our green, leafy vegetables, but with the addition of syringic acid.  Syringic acid is a nutrient that's been found to help regulate blood sugar levels.

Combine these amazing abilities with a nutrient density score of a whopping 89.27, and you've got yourself a vegetable that's not just pretty to look at, it's pretty darn good for you to eat it as well.

2 Chinese Cabbage 91.99
Chinese Cabbage

Like regular cabbage, only taller.  Oh, and also packed with an incredible amount of nutrients.  Chinese cabbage, or bok choy, contains very good amounts of 21 different nutrients.  This includes omega-3 fatty acids and even high concentrations of zinc.

Chinese cabbage is a great addition to any diet, but it's especially useful if you're looking for dietary sources of anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories.

1 Watercress 100.00
Watercress

And the Winner Is!

Watercress tops off the list at #1 with the unmatched nutrient density score of 100.  You don't hear a lot of talk about watercress outside of the nutritionally well informed, but it's long been known as a superfood.  Despite being very low in calories, it contains a wide variety of nutrients, without going overboard on the vitamin K as many green, leafy vegetables do.  In fact, watercress doesn't go all out in any single ingredient.  Where it shines is in its  jack-of-all-trades nature.

The Link Between Obesity and Dementia

By Steve Moren
on September 10, 2015

 A new study has shown a direct link between BMI (Body Mass Index), and the speed at which Alzheimer’s Disease develops.  In fact, each extra point of BMI can cause Alzheimer’s disease to develop seven months earlier than it would have if your weight had been within healthy levels.  These are staggering results.  Especially when you consider that a person who is only mildly obese (BMI of around 30) is at risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease three years sooner.  That’s three additional years of lost time, lost memories, confusion, stress, worry and financial strain...

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We Are Battery Operated

By Steve Moren
on August 01, 2015

Did you know that humans are battery operated?

Meditating, energetic man

It’s true.  The cells in our bodies will all do their own thing with the chemical energy alone.  However, to coordinate these processes, correctly time your heart’s rhythm,trigger your muscles so that they contract and relax in unison and even to have the thoughts and memories that make you who you are…  for all of that, we need battery power.  Electrical energy runs the computer that is our brains.  This electrical energy controls everything we do by providing us with a timing mechanism for critical processes.  It is also used as a communication network that can send signals through the brain and spine out to organs and extremities far faster than any chemical method could.

As a quick physics refresher, remember that everything is made of atoms.  Atoms themselves can be further divided into the protons and neutrons that inhabit the core of the atom, and the electrons that move throughout the space around that core.  Protons and electrons are electromagnetically charged particles, whereas neutrons have a neutral charge.  To make it easier to conceptualize, we call electromagnetic charges either positive (protons) or negative (electrons).  Now, this has nothing to do with the particle’s outlook on life, and you’re not going to find electrons hanging out at dimly lit coffee bars reading Edgar Allen Poe.  Positive and negative are just the words we use to describe these opposite charges.

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From the Blog

Independence from Monsanto

Independence from Monsanto

July 01, 2017

Monsanto is giant, and not a gentle one.  It may feel impossible to avoid their reach, the genetically modified Frankenfoods that they pedal, and the toxic business practices which they employ.  If not impossible, you might think that ditching Monsanto for healthier, and more sustainable options might seem like such a daunting task that it’s not even worth the effort.  But fear not!   We have a few steps that will help you avoid Monsanto, or, at the very least, cut out much of the genetically modified food in your diet.

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