Thiamine

Contained In

Dry yeast, brown rice husk, whole wheat, oatmeal, peanuts, pork, most vegetables, bran, and milk.

Functions*

  • It helps break down carbohydrates into glucose, vital to the production of energy.
  • It assists with proper muscle coordination.
  • Necessary for a healthy nervous system.

 *Other essential nutrients also contribute to the physiological functions and processes mentioned here.

Many of the water soluble B-complex vitamins, including thiamine, are referred to as "anti-stress" vitamins.  Though they gained this reputation for an indirect reason.  Instead of reducing stress, B vitamins may help strengthen your immune system.  This improves your body's ability to withstand the stress you experience.

Dietary Needs  DV 1.5 mg

Age

Male

Female

Pregnancy

Lactation

Birth to 6 months*

0.2 mg

0.2 mg

 

 

7–12 months*

0.3 mg

0.3 mg

 

 

1–3 years

0.5 mg

0.5 mg

 

 

4–8 years

0.6 mg

0.6 mg

 

 

9–13 years

0.9 mg

0.9 mg

 

 

14–18 years

1.2 mg

1.0 mg

1.4 mg

1.4 mg

19-50 years

1.2 mg

1.1 mg

1.4 mg

1.4 mg

51+ years

1.2 mg

1.1 mg

 

 

*Adequate Intake (AI)

Toxicity

Essentially non-toxic.  Excess is excreted in the urine. There has been a lack of reports of adverse effects from taking large amounts of thiamine.  The hypothesis is that this is due to poor absorption of doses above 5 mg.  Despite the lack of an established Upper Intake Level (UL), it is still possible that excessive amounts of thiamine could have adverse effects.

Deficiency

Other than insufficient intakes of thiamin from the diet, the causes of thiamin deficiency include lower absorption or higher excretion rates than average due to certain health conditions or use of some medications.

Thiamin deficiency can cause confusion, short-term memory loss, anorexia, muscle weakness and cardiovascular symptoms in its early stages.  Beriberi is the most common effect, which causes peripheral neuropathy and wasting.  On top of impaired sensory, motor, and reflex functions, beriberi can cause congestive heart failure. Beriberi is uncommon in developed countries, but not unheard of.  Administration of thiamine by health care providers quickly counteracts beriberi.

Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is also associated with thiamine deficiency, and is not as uncommon as beriberi.  It is much more prevalent in people with alcoholism, who are eight to ten times more likely to develop it.  Those who suffer from severe gastrointestinal disorders, hematologic malignancies, drug use or AIDS are at increased risk as well. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome usually has two phases. The acute and life-threatening stage, called Wernicke’s encephalopathy, involves the development of peripheral neuropathy. Without treatment, up to 20% of people with Wernicke’s encephalopathy die.  Survivors enter the second phase, Korsakoff’s psychosis.  Not all individuals with Korsakoff’s psychosis have had Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Symptoms of Korsakoff’s psychosis include severe disorientation, short-term memory loss, and confabulation (inability to distinguish between real and imagined memories).

Best Taken With

Supplementing with vitamin B-1 is most effective when the following nutrients are sufficient:

There have been cases of allergic reactions to thiamine supplement, but these are quite rare.

Products Containing Thiamine

brought to you by VitaMist, Ltd.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
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