Vitamins are food substances organic in nature found only in living things, for example plants and animals. They are essential for our bodies to function properly, for growth, energy and for our general well-being. With very few exceptions the human body cannot manufacture or synthesize vitamins, so many people add them to their diet through man-made dietary supplements.

Can Vitamins replace food?

Some people believe that vitamins can replace food, but that is incorrect. In fact, vitamins cannot be assimilated without also ingesting food. That is why it is best to take them with a meal. Synthetic vitamin supplements can be of varying quality, so it is a good idea to get your supplements from a reliable source.

What are Minerals?

Minerals are elements that originate in the soil and cannot be created by living things, such as plants and animals. Yet plants, animals and humans need minerals in order to be healthy. Plants absorb minerals from the soil, and animals get their minerals from the plants or other animals they eat. Most of the minerals in the human diet come directly from plants, such as fruits and vegetables, or indirectly from animal sources.

Can minerals come from your water?

Minerals may also be present in your drinking water, but this depends on where you live, and what kind of water you drink (bottled, tap). Minerals from plant sources may also vary from place to place, because the mineral content of the soil varies according to the location in which the plant was grown.

Please take note that I have listed only those foods which contain the listed vitamins in significant quantities. For more detailed information, please visit the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food & Nutrition Center.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A helps cell reproduction. It also stimulates immunity and is needed for formation of some hormones. Vitamin A helps vision and promotes bone growth, tooth development, and helps maintain healthy skin, hair, and mucous membranes. It has been shown to be an effective preventive against measles.

Deficiency can cause night blindness, dry skin, poor bone growth, and weak tooth enamel.

Alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and retinol are all versions of Vitamin A.

Most fruits contain vitamin A, but the following fruits have a significant amount:

Cantaloupes Grapefruit Guava
Mango Papaya Passionfruit
Tomatoes Watermelon Amaranth Leaves
Bok Choy Broccoli Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash Carrots Chinese Broccoli
Chinese Cabbage Kale Leeks
Peas Pumpkin Rapini
Spinach Squash – summer Squash – winter
Sweet Potato Swiss Chard
Chestnuts Pecans Pistachios
Cheddar Cheese Cream Cheese Cows Milk
Whipping Cream Eggs Tuna
Goat Milk Goat Cheese Sour Cream
Most legumes do not contain a significant amount of Vitamin A

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Vitamin B1/thiamine is important in the production of energy. It helps the body cells convert carbohydrates into energy. It is also essential for the functioning of the heart, muscles, and nervous system. Not getting enough thiamine can leave one fatigued and weak.

Note: Most fruits and vegetables are not a significant source of thiamine.

Avocado Boysenberries Breadfruit
Cherimoya Dates Grapes
Grapefruit Guava Loganberries
Mango Orange Pineapple
Pomegranate Watermelon Asparagus
Brussels Sprouts Butternut Squash Corn
French Beans Lima Beans Okra
Parsnips Peas Potatoes
Spirulina Sweet Potato Brazil Nuts
Buckwheat Cashews Chestnuts
Flax Seed Filberts/Hazelnuts Macadamia Nuts
Millet Oats Peanuts
Pecans Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pistachios
Quinoa Rice Brown Rye
Spelt Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red
Wheat – Hard White Beef Cows Milk
Catfish Herring Salmon
Tuna Goat Milk Pork
Soy Beans Soy Milk Lowfat Yogurt
Roast Duck Bacon Pork Sausage
Ground Chicken Black Beans Black Eye Peas
Kidney Beans Navy Beans White Beans
Winged Beans

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Vitamin B2 or riboflavin is important for body growth, reproduction and red cell production. It also helps in releasing energy from carbohydrates.

Avocado Banana Cherimoya
Dates Grapes Lychee
Mango Mulberries Passion Fruit
Pomegranate Prickly Pear Amaranth Leaves
Artichoke Asparagus Bok Choy
Brussels Sprouts Chinese Broccoli French Beans
Lima Beans Mushrooms Peas
Pumpkin Spirulina Squash – winter
Sweet Potato Swiss Chard Almonds
Buckwheat Chestnuts Oats
Quinoa Rye Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White Beef
Cheddar Cheese Cottage Cheese Chicken (dark meat)
Eggs Caviar Herring
Pollock Salmon Sardines
Tuna Goat Milk Goat Cheese
Lamb Pork Soy Beans
Soy Milk Turkey Breast Turkey Bacon
Veal Yogurt Sour Cream
Turkey Leg Lowfat Yogurt Roast Duck
Hamburger Beef Sausage Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken Adzuki Beans Fava Beans
Edamame Garbanzo Beans Mung Beans
Navy Beans Pinto Beans Soy Beans
Winged Beans

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Niacin assists in the functioning of the digestive system, skin, and nerves. It is also important for the conversion of food to energy.

Avocado Boysenberries Breadfruit
Cherimoya Dates Guava
Loganberries Lychee Mango
Nectarine Passion Fruit Peach
Artichoke Butternut Squash Corn
Mushrooms Okra Parsnip
Peas Potatoes Pumpkin
Spirulina Spaghetti Squash Squash – winter
Sweet Potato Barley Buckwheat
Peanuts Rye Spelt
Sunflower Seeds Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red
Wheat – Hard White Beef Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat) Anchovies Catfish
Cod Herring Perch
Pollock Salmon Sardines
Tuna Lamb Pork
Turkey Breast Turkey Bacon Veal
Turkey Leg Hot Dog (Turkey) Roast Duck
Hamburger Bacon Pork Sausage
Beef Sausage Ground Turkey Ground Chicken
Adzuki Beans Fava Beans Edamame
Pigeon Beans Split Peas Soy Beans
Winged Beans

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

Pantothenic acid is essential for the metabolism of food as well as in the formation of hormones and (good) cholesterol.

Avocado Black Currants Breadfruit
Cherimoya Dates Gooseberries
Grapefruit Guava Pomegranate
Raspberries Starfruit Watermelon
Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Butternut Squash
Corn French Beans Mushrooms
Okra Parsnip Potatoes
Pumpkin Spirulina Spaghetti Squash
Squash – summer Squash – winter Sweet Potato
Buckwheat Chestnuts Oats
Rye Sunflower Seeds Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White Beef
Chicken Breast Chicken (dark meat) Cows Milk
Eggs Catfish Caviar
Herring Perch Salmon
Sardines Tuna Goat Milk
Lamb Pork Soy Milk
Turkey Breast Veal Yogurt
Turkey Leg Lowfat Yogurt Roast Duck
Hamburger Beef Sausage Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken Adzuki Beans Black Eye Peas
Edamame Lima Beans Mung Beans
Soy Beans Split Peas

Vitamin B6 (Pryidoxine)

B6 plays a role in the creation of antibodies in the immune system. It helps maintain normal nerve function and acts in the formation of red blood cells. It is also required for the chemical reactions of proteins. The higher the protein intake, the more need there is for vitamin B6. Too little B6 in the diet can cause dizziness, nausea, confusion, irritability and convulsions.

Avocado Banana Breadfruit
Cherimoya Dates Gooseberries
Grapes Guava Lychee
Mango Passion Fruit Pineapple
Pomegranate Watermelon Amaranth Leaves
Bok Choy Broccoli Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash Celeriac Corn
French Beans Green Pepper Kale
Lima Beans Okra Peas
Potatoes Spirulina Spaghetti Squash
Squash – winter Sweet Potato Taro
Chestnuts Filberts/Hazelnuts Pistachios
Pumpkin Seeds Rice Brown Rye
Sunflower Seeds Walnuts Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat) Catfish Cod
Herring Pollock Salmon
Sardines Tuna Pork
Soy Beans Soy Milk Turkey Breast
Turkey Bacon Veal Turkey Leg
Roast Duck Hamburger Beef Sausage
Ground Turkey Ground Chicken Black Eye Peas
Edamame Garbanzo Beans Kidney Beans
Lima Beans Navy Beans Pinto Beans
Soy Beans White Beans

Vitamin B9 (Folate/Folic Acid)

Folate and folic acid are both forms of B9. Folate occurs naturally in fresh foods, whereas folic acid is the synthetic form found in supplements. Your body needs folate to produce red blood cells, as well as components of the nervous system. It helps in the formation and creation of DNA and maintaining normal brain function, and is a critical part of spinal fluid. It has also been proven to reduce the risk for an NTD-affected (neural tube defect) pregnancy by 50 to 70 percent. Folic acid is vital for proper cell growth and development of the embryo. That is why it is important for a woman to have enough folate/folic acid in her body both before and during pregnancy.

Avocado Blackberries Boysenberries
Breadfruit Cherimoya Dates
Guava Loganberries Lychee
Mango Orange Papaya
Passionfruit Pineapple Pomegranate
Raspberries Strawberries Amaranth Leaves
Artichoke Asparagus Beetroot
Bok Choy Broccoli Brussels Sprouts
Chinese Broccoli Chinese Cabbage French Beans
Lima Beans Okra Parsnip
Peas Potatoes Spinach
Spirulina Squash – summer Squash – winter
Buckwheat Chestnuts Filberts/Hazelnuts
Oats Peanuts Quinoa
Rye Sunflower Seeds Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White Cheddar Cheese
Eggs Salmon Lamb
Soy Beans Soy Milk Lowfat Yogurt
Beef Jerky

Most legumes are good sources of Folate but these are very good sources:

Black Eye Peas Edamame Soy Beans

Vitamin B12

Like the other B vitamins, vitamin B12 is important for metabolism. It helps in the formation of red blood cells and in the maintenance of the central nervous system.

Vitamin B12 is the one vitamin that is available only from fish, poultry, meat or dairy sources in food.

No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B12.

Beef Cheddar Cheese Cottage Cheese
Cows Milk Eggs Catfish
Caviar Cod Herring
Perch Pollock Salmon
Sardines Tuna Lamb
Pork Veal Yogurt
Lowfat Yogurt Hamburger Beef Sausage
Hot Dog (Beef) Ground Chicken Legumes do not contain a significant amount of vitamin B12.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of the most important of all vitamins. It plays a significant role as an antioxidant, thereby protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation. Antioxidants act to protect your cells against the effects of free radicals, which are potentially damaging by-products of the body’s metabolism. Free radicals can cause cell damage that may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Vitamin C has also been found by scientists to be an effective antiviral agent.

Black Currants Breadfruit Grapefruit
Guava Kiwi Lychee
Mango Mulberries Orange
Papaya Passionfruit Pineapple
Strawberries Amaranth Leaves Bok Choy
Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Butternut Squash
Green Pepper Kale Swiss Chard
Other than Chestnuts, most nuts do not contain a significant amount of vitamin C. Cod Perch
Goat Milk Soy Beans Lowfat Yogurt
Other than Edamame, most legumes do not contain a significant amount of vitamin C

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is known as the “sunshine vitamin” since it is manufactured by the body after being exposed to sunshine. Ten to fifteen minutes of good sunshine three times weekly is adequate to produce the body’s requirement of vitamin D. This means that we don’t need to obtain vitamin D from our diet unless we get very little sunlight – usually not a problem for children.

Vitamin D is vital to the human body as it promotes absorption of calcium and magnesium, which are essential for the normal development of healthy teeth and bones. It also helps maintain adequate levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood.

Mushrooms No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin D. Beef
Cheddar Cheese Cream Cheese Chicken Breast
Cow’s Milk Whipping Cream Eggs
Anchovies Caviar Cod
Herring Sardines Goat Cheese
Turkey Bacon Yogurt Sour Cream
Hot Dog (Turkey) Hamburger Bacon
Pork Sausage Beef Sausage Hot Dog (Beef)
Ground Turkey Legumes do not contain a significant amount of vitamin D.

Vitamin E

Note: some researchers and medical experts believe that with all of the positive studies using higher doses of vitamin E, this daily recommended intake is not high enough.

Like vitamin C, vitamin E plays a significant role as an antioxidant, thereby protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation. It is important in the formation of red blood cells and the use of vitamin K. Many women also use it to help minimize the appearance of wrinkles, and mothers use it to help heal minor wounds without scarring, as it is valued for its ability to soothe and heal broken or stressed skin tissue.

Avocado Blackberries Black Currants
Blueberries Boysenberries Breadfruit
Cranberries Guava Kiwi
Loganberries Mango Mulberries
Nectarine Papaya Peach
Pomegranate Raspberries Butternut Squash
Parsnip Potatoes Pumpkin
Spirulina Swiss Chard Taro
Almonds Filberts/Hazelnuts Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Sunflower Seeds Eggs Herring
Sardines Turkey Bacon Edamame
Pinto Beans

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is fat soluble and plays a critical role in blood clotting. It regulates blood calcium levels and activates at least 3 proteins involved in bone health.

Avocado Blackberries Blueberries
Boysenberries Chinese Pear Cranberries
Grapes Kiwi Loganberries
Mango Mulberries Pear
Plum Pomegranate Raspberries
Tomatoes Alfalfa, sprouted Artichoke
Asparagus Bok Choy Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts Cabbage Carrots
Cauliflower Celery Chinese Broccoli
Cucumber Kale Leeks
Okra Peas Rapini
Spinach Spirulina Squash – winter
Swiss Chard Cashews Chestnuts
Filberts/Hazelnuts Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pistachios
Rye Beef Cheddar Cheese
Eggs Anchovies Lamb
Soy Milk Turkey Bacon Turkey Leg
Roast Duck Edamame Kidney Beans
Split Pea

Calcium

Calcium eases insomnia and helps regulate the passage of nutrients through cell walls. Without calcium, your muscles wouldn’t contract correctly, your blood wouldn’t clot and your nerves wouldn’t carry messages.

If you don’t get enough calcium from the food you eat, your body automatically takes the calcium needed from your bones. If your body continues to tear down more bone than it replaces over a period of years in order to get sufficient calcium, your bones will become weak and break easily.

Deficiency may result in muscle spasms and cramps in the short term and osteoporosis.

Most fruits contain some calcium, these have a bit more than usual:

Blackberries Blackcurrants Dates
Grapefruit Mulberries Orange
Pomegranate Prickly Pears

Most vegetables contain some calcium, these have a bit more than usual:

Amaranth leaves Bok Choy Brussels Sprouts
Butternut squash Celery Chinese Broccoli
French Beans Kale Okra
Parsnip Spirulina Swiss Chard
Turnip Almonds Amaranth
Brazil Nuts Filberts/Hazelnuts Oats
Pistachios Sesame Seeds Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard White

Meat and Proteins:

Cottage Cheese Cream Cheese Cow’s Milk
Eggs Caviar Perch
Pollock Sardines Goat Milk
Goat Cheese Soy Beans Yogurt
Sour Cream Lowfat Yogurt Edamame
Navy Beans Soy Beans White Beans
Winged Beans Cheddar Cheese

Copper

Copper is involved in the absorption, storage and metabolism of iron and the formation of red blood cells. It also helps supply oxygen to the body. The symptoms of a copper deficiency are similar to iron-deficiency anemia.

Most fruits contain a small a fruit has a significant amount. mount of copper, but kiwi

Avocado Blackberries Dates
Guava Kiwi Fruit Lychee
Mango Passionfruit Pomegranate
Most vegetables have some copper, but Lima Beans have a significant amount. Amaranth leaves Artichoke
French Beans Kale Lima Beans
Parsnip Peas Potatoes
Pumpkin Spirulina Squash – Winter
Sweet Potato Swiss Chard Taro
Most nuts contain a trace amount of copper. Brazil Nuts Buckwheat
Cashews Chestnuts Filberts/Hazelnuts
Oats Sunflower Seeds Walnuts
Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red

Most proteins contain a trace amount of copper.

Cheddar Cheese Perch Salmon
Sardines Goat Cheese Soy Beans
Soy Milk Turkey Bacon Veal
Turkey Leg Roast Duck Adzuki Beans
Black Beans Black Eye Peas Fava Beans
Edamame Garbanzo Beans Kidney Beans
Lima Beans Navy Beans Pigeon Beans
Pinto Beans Soy Beans Winged Beans
Beef

Iodine

Iodine helps regulate the rate of energy production and body weight and promotes proper growth. It also promotes healthy hair, nails, skin and teeth.

In countries where iodine is deficient in the soil, rates of hypothyroidism, goiter and retarded growth from iodine deficiency are very high.

In developed countries, however, because iodine is added to table salt, iodine deficiencies are rare.

Fruits grown in iodine-rich soils contain iodine.

Vegetables grown in iodine-rich soils contain iodine.

Nuts grown in iodine-rich soils contain iodine.

Proteins produced in iodine-rich areas contain iodine.

Most legumes do not contain a significant amout of Iodine

Iron

Most at risk of iron deficiency are infants, adolescent girls and pregnant women.

Iron deficiency in infants can result in impaired learning ability and behavioral problems. It can also affect the immune system and cause weakness and fatigue.

To aid in the absorption of iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C at the same time you eat the food containing iron. The tannin in non-herbal tea can hinder absorption of iron.

Take iron supplements and your vitamin E at different times of the day, as the iron supplements will tend to neutralize the vitamin E.

Vegetarians need to get twice as much dietary iron as meat eaters.

While most fruits have some iron, probably the best source of iron for children is raisins, which are rich in iron. Other fruits which have a good amount of iron are:

Avocado Blackberries Blackcurrant
Boysenberries Breadfruit Cherries
Dates Figs Grapes
Kiwi Lemon Loganberries
Lychee Mulberries Passion Fruit
Persimmon Pomegranate Raspberries
Strawberry Watermelon Vegetables:
Amaranth leaves Bok Choy Brussels Sprouts
Butternut squash French Beans Kale
Leeks Lima Beans Peas
Potatoes Pumpkin Spirulina
Swiss Chard Most nuts contain a small amount of iron. Amaranth
Buckwheat Cashews Coconut
Oats Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pumpkin Seeds
Rye Spelt Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White Meat and Proteins:
Beef Caviar Sardines
Goat Cheese Lamb Soy Beans
Soy Milk Turkey Bacon Turkey Leg
Roast Duck Hamburger Beef Sausage
Beef Jerky Ground Turkey Adzuki Beans
Black Beans Black Eye Peas Fava Beans
Edamame Garbanzo Beans Kidney Beans
Lima Beans Mung Beans Navy Beans
Pigeon Beans Pinto Beans Soy Beans
Split Peas White Beans Winged Beans

Magnesium

Magnesium is needed for bone, protein, making new cells, activating B vitamins, relaxing nerves and muscles, clotting blood, and in energy production.

Insulin secretion and function also requires magnesium. Magnesium also assists in the absorption of calcium, vitamin C and potassium.

Deficiency may result in fatigue, nervousness, insomnia, heart problems, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cramps.

Fruits:

Avocado Banana Blackberries
Blackcurrants Breadfruit Cherimoya
Dates Guava Kiwi
Loganberries Mulberries Passion Fruit
Pomegranate Prickly Pear Raspberries
Watermelon

Vegetables:

Amaranth leaves Artichoke Butternut squash
French Beans Lima Beans Okra
Peas Spirulina Swiss Chard

Nuts:

Almonds Amaranth Brazil Nuts
Buckwheat Cashews Oats
Peanuts Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pumpkin Seeds
Quinoa Rye Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White

Meat and Proteins:

Beef Cheddar Cheese Caviar
Cod Herring Perch
Pollock Salmon Sardines
Tuna Goat Milk Soy Beans
Soy Milk Lowfat Yogurt

Most legumes are a good source of Magnesium but these are the highest.

Adzuki Beans Black Beans Black Eye Peas
Edamame Navy Beans Pinto Beans
Soy Beans White Beans Winged Beans

Manganese

The functions of this mineral are not specific since other minerals can perform in its place. Manganese does function in enzyme reactions concerning blood sugar, metabolism, and thyroid hormone function. Deficiency is rare in humans.

Most fruits contain manganese, but the following fruits have a significant amount:

Avocado Banana Blackberries
Blackcurrants Blueberries Boysenberries
Cranberries Dates Gooseberries
Grapefruit Guava Loganberries
Pineapple Pomegranate Raspberries
Strawberry Vegetables: Amaranth leaves
Brussels Sprouts Butternut squash French Beans
Kale Leeks Lima Beans
Okra Parsnip Peas
Potatoes Spirulina Squash – Winter
Sweet Potato Swiss Chard Taro

Most nuts contain manganese, but the following nuts have a significant amount:

Buckwheat Coconut Filberts/Hazelnuts
Macadamia Nuts Oats Pecans
Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pumpkin Seeds Rice Brown
Rye Spelt Wheat – Durum
Wheat – Hard Red Wheat – Hard White

Meat and Proteins:

Eggs Anchovies Herring
Perch Sardines Goat Milk
Goat Cheese Soy Beans Soy Milk
Veal Sour Cream Beef Jerky
Hot Dog (Beef)

Most legumes are a good source of Manganese but these are the highest.

Adzuki Beans Edamame Garbanzo Beans
Lima Beans Navy Beans Pigeon Beans
Soy Beans White Beans Winged Beans

Phosphorous

In combination with calcium, phosphorus is necessary for the formation of bones and teeth and of the nerve cells.

Phosphorus is second to calcium in abundance in the body.

It is very widely distributed in both plant and animal foods so it is unlikely that deficiency would be a problem.

Fruits:

Avocado Blackcurrants Breadfruit
Dates Guava Kiwi
Lychee Mulberries Passionfruit
Pomegranate

Vegetables:

Amaranth leaves Artichoke Brussels Sprouts
Celeriac Corn French Beans
Lima Beans Parsnip Peas
Potatoes Pumpkin Spirulina
Taro

Nuts:

Brazil Nuts Buckwheat Cashews
Oats Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pumpkin Seeds
Quinoa Rye Spelt
Sunflower Seeds Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red
Wheat – Hard White

Meat and Proteins:

Beef Cheddar Cheese Herring
Perch Pollock Salmon
Sardines Tuna Goat Milk
Goat Cheese Soy Beans Turkey Bacon
Lowfat Yogurt

Most legumes are a good source of Phospherous but these are the highest.

Adzuki Beans Black Beans Black Eye Peas
Fava Beans Edamame Garbanzo Beans
Kidney Beans Lima Beans Navy Beans
Pigeon Beans Pinto Beans Soy Beans
White Beans Winged Beans

Potassium

Potassium is essential for the body’s growth and maintenance. It is necessary to keep a normal water balance between the cells and body fluids.

Potassium plays an essential role in proper heart function.

Deficiency may cause muscular cramps, twitching and weakness, irregular heartbeat, insomnia, kidney and lung failure.

Fruits:

Avocado Bananas Blackcurrants
Breadfruit Cherimoya Cherries
Chinesepear Dates Grapefruit
Guava Kiwi Lychee
Papaya Passionfruit Pomegranate
Pricklypear Watermelon

Vegetables:

Amaranth leaves Bamboo Shoots Bok Choy
Butternut squash French Beans Lima Beans
Parsnips Potatoes Pumpkin
Spirulina Sweet Potatoes Swiss Chard
Nuts: Almonds Buckwheat
Chestnuts Coconut Oats
Pistachios Pumpkin Seeds Rye
Sunflower Seeds Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red
Wheat – Hard White

Meat and Proteins:

Beef Cows Milk Catfish
Herring Perch Pollock
Salmon Sardines Tuna
Goat Milk Pork Soy Beans
Turkey Bacon Veal Yogurt
Lowfat Yogurt Pork Sausage Ground Chicken

Most legumes are a great source of Potassium but these are the highest.

Adzuki Beans Edamame Kidney Beans
Lima Beans Pinto Beans Soy Beans
White Beans

Selenium

Selenium is a part of several enzymes necessary for the body to properly function. Generally, selenium functions as an antioxidant that works in conjunction with vitamin E.

Selenium deficiency is rare in humans.

Most fruits contain a small amount of selenium, but dates have a significant amount.

Bananas Breadfruit Guava
Lychee Mango Passionfruit
Pomegranate Watermelon

Vegetables:

Asparagus Brussels Sprouts French Beans
Lima Beans Mushrooms Parsnip
Peas Spirulina

Most nuts contain selenium, but the following nuts have a significant amount:

Amaranth Barley Brazil Nuts
Buckwheat Cashews Coconut
Rye Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red

Meat and Proteins:

Beef Cheddar Cheese Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat) Eggs Anchovies
Caviar Cod Herring
Perch Pollock Salmon
Sardines Tuna Lamb
Pork Soy Beans Turkey Breast
Turkey Bacon Veal Turkey Leg
Roast Duck Hamburger Bacon
Ground Turkey

Most legumes are a good source of Selenium but these are the highest.

Black Eye Peas Fava Beans Garbanzo Beans
Lima Beans Mung Beans Navy Beans
Pigeon Beans Pinto Beans Soy Beans
Winged Beans

Sodium

Sodium is required by the body to regulate blood pressure and blood volume. It helps regulate the fluid balance in your body. Sodium also helps in the proper functioning of muscles and nerves.

Many people get far more sodium than they need, which tends to cause health problems.

Different body types need different amounts of sodium.

Sodium occurs naturally in almost all fresh, whole fruits but passionfruit has a significant amount.

Sodium occurs naturally in almost all fresh, whole vegetables, these have significant amounts:

Amaranth leaves Artichoke Broccoli
Beetroot Bok Choy Brussels Sprouts
Celeriac Celery Fennel
Kale Spirulina Spaghetti squash
Sweet Potatoes Swiss Chard

Most seeds, nuts and grains have some sodium, these have more than others:

Amaranth Coconut Pumpkin Seeds
Quinoa Spelt

Meat and Proteins:

Cheddar Cheese Cottage Cheese Cream Cheese
Cows Milk Eggs Anchovies
Caviar Herring Pollock
Sardines Goat Milk Goat Cheese
Soy Milk Turkey Bacon Yogurt
Lowfat Yogurt Hot Dog (Turkey) Bacon
Pork Sausage Beef Sausage Beef Jerky
Hot Dog (Beef)

Most legumes are not a good source of Sodium.

Winged Beans have more than most other legumes.

Zinc

Vegetarians need about 50 percent more zinc in their diet than meat eaters.

This metal is important in a number of key activities, ranging from protein and carbohydrate metabolism to the immune system, wound healing, growth and vision.

Severe deficiency can contribute to stunted growth. Deficiency can sometimes be seen in white spots on the fingernails.

Most fruits contain a small amount of zinc, but the following have a significant amount:

Avocado Blackberries Dates
Loganberries Pomegranate Raspberries

Vegetables:

Amaranth leaves Asparagus Bamboo Shoots
Brussels Sprouts Corn French Beans
Lima Beans Okra Peas
Potatoes Pumpkin Spirulina
Swiss Chard

Most nuts have some zinc, but these have a significant amount:

Buckwheat Cashews Oats
Pine Nuts/Pignolias Pumpkin Seeds Rye
Sunflower Seeds Wheat – Durum Wheat – Hard Red
Wheat – Hard White

Meat and Proteins:

Beef Cheddar Cheese Chicken Breast
Chicken (dark meat) Eggs Catfish
Herring Sardines Lamb
Pork Soy Beans Turkey Breast
Turkey Bacon Veal Yogurt
Turkey Leg Lowfat Yogurt Roast Duck
Hamburger Bacon Beef Sausage
Beef Jerky Hot Dog (Beef) Ground Turkey
Ground Chicken

Most legumes are a good source of Magnesium but these are the highest:

Adzuki Beans Black Beans Black Eye Peas
Fava Beans Edamame Garbanzo Beans
Kidney Beans Navy Beans Soy Beans
Split Peas White Beans Winged Beans